Published in Florida Water Resources Journal: Keys to Planning, Designing, and Permitting Resilient Coastal Restoration Projects

July 17, 2018

Matt Starr and Jeff Tabar discuss how using a well-defined plan of action and proactive approach to resiliency will help communities reduce coastal risk now and in the future

By Matthew Starr and Jeff Tabar

 

Coastal resiliency can have many different interpretations and applications, depending on the location and goals of all stakeholders involved. Cities and organizations should support and encourage forward-looking leadership, while understanding that resiliency takes time.

About the Authors

  • Matthew Starr has dedicated his entire career to protecting our coastlines and waterways along the Gulf. He has more than 15 years of experience in coastal engineering, beach nourishment, dredging, shoreline stabilization, ecosystem restoration, and wildlife biology.

  • As a coastal and civil engineer with over 20 years of experience, Jeff Tabar works in resiliency planning, post-storm damage assessments, project management, design, and more.

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