David Dixon

David Dixon, FAIA, is Stantec’s Urban Places Planning and Urban Design Leader. A sought-after expert and author in urban planning and design, David is known for helping create new, mixed-use urban districts. Based in Boston, David is the co-editor of “Suburban Remix: Creating the Next Generation of Urban Places” (Island Press, February 2018).

  • Joining America Walks opened my eyes—it’s a long path to genuine walkability for everyone

    Joining America Walks opened my eyes—it’s a long path to genuine walkability for everyone

    Walking is clearly beneficial for people and communities, yet assuring walkability for everyone turns out to be a lot of (worthwhile) hard work

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  • Published: Demographics are Destiny: Dublin, Ohio Responds

    Published: Demographics are Destiny: Dublin, Ohio Responds

    Adapted from his presentation at the "Who is Reinventing the Suburbs" session at CNU 26 in Savannah, David Dixon discusses a case study on suburban redevelopment.

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  • WEBINAR RECORDING: What is 21st Century Urbanism?

    WEBINAR RECORDING: What is 21st Century Urbanism?

    Changing demographics and socioeconomic shifts mean a lot of opportunity for cities, but they also bring a lot of challenges. How do we plan for this new urban future?

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  • WEBINAR RECORDING: Giving New Life to Dying Malls

    WEBINAR RECORDING: Giving New Life to Dying Malls

    In the face of big changes to retail that have changed the status of the shopping mall, how can we tap powerful demographic and market forces to breathe new life into these strategic sites?

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  • What does Value of Downtowns report tell us about tomorrow’s cities and regions? (Part 2)

    What does Value of Downtowns report tell us about tomorrow’s cities and regions? (Part 2)

    New report provides a window to the future, which includes autonomous vehicles, job growth, and community diversity

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  • Read a free chapter of Suburban Remix, edited by Jason Beske and David Dixon

    Read a free chapter of Suburban Remix, edited by Jason Beske and David Dixon

    In chapter 2, David Dixon traces the history of American suburbs from the 1850s to 20th-century sprawl and frames today's interest in compact, walkable suburbs

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  • Boxed in by changing markets, 20th-century suburbs learn how to reinvent themselves

    Boxed in by changing markets, 20th-century suburbs learn how to reinvent themselves

    In the competition for knowledge workers and jobs, suburbs find a surprising road to success: Becoming more urban

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  • What does The Value of Downtowns report tell us about today’s cities? (Part 1)

    What does The Value of Downtowns report tell us about today’s cities? (Part 1)

    New IDA/Stantec research aims to measure how downtowns contribute to critical issues like social inclusion, vibrancy, and resilience

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  • The Road Ahead

    The rise of autonomous transit can unlock opportunities for urban places to grow simultaneously denser, more livable, and greener, writes David Dixon in ArchitectureBoston magazine

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  • Can a city’s downtown be its portal to prosperity?

    Can a city’s downtown be its portal to prosperity?

    A $3 billion investment in Water Street Tampa is connecting the Tampa Bay region to the global knowledge economy

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  • To make your community healthier, increase its density and its walkability

    High-density, walkable communities can have a major effect on public health—and economic benefits too

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  • Teaching infrastructure to multitask: A strategy for resilience

    Teaching infrastructure to multitask: A strategy for resilience

    Let’s take a fresh approach to infrastructure’s role in creating resilient communities

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  • The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 1): 3 urban trends driving economic inequality

    The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 1): 3 urban trends driving economic inequality

    How urban centers are turning into engines for equity crisis (and some solutions).

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  • The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 2): How displacing low-income families increases inequality

    The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 2): How displacing low-income families increases inequality

    How displacing low-income families from urban centers increases socioeconomic disparity, and what to do about it.

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  • The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 3): A trio of urban projects fighting economic inequity

    The Jane Jacobs conundrum (Part 3): A trio of urban projects fighting economic inequity

    The challenge isn’t just reinvigorating our cities, but making sure everyone benefits

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